Raising a Creative Child – ETB #145

Our family has a wonderful announcement to share with the world! My son recently won an Emmy for cinematography for his part in a documentary called Challenge Accepted about a young girl named Faith-Christina. Every child is different, but I want to share with you some ways in which we went about raising a creative child who went on to win an Emmy.

Raising a Creative Child - ETB #145

This is the beginning of a series of episodes about raising different kinds of kids to adulthood and preparing them for their desired careers. In this episode, I’m going to share the journey of raising a creative child who became a videographer and ended up winning an Emmy.

There’s no right way to walk this path, but there are good practices and wise choices. I can share through what I know about Strengths Finders and personalities some of how and why we did what we did.

The Early Years

We noticed early on that my son had an affinity to make movies. He loved to read novels and do his writing assignments about making movies or related topics. This led to me encouraging him to start writing his own scripts. We got him a video camera and he started making his own movies. I’d help scout locations and his siblings and friends would be his actors. We’d gather costumes from our closets and thrift stores. And then he’d go out and shoot these movies.

High School

This bent for filmmaking brought with it related interests. My son started doing sound for our church. He joined a band and dig some gigs with his friends. But, everything he did was in the creative realm and brought him back to filmmaking and being behind the camera. I began to plant seeds of career paths such as having his own videography business or production studio.

Overcoming Adversity

Right about the time that my son was applying to college and competitive degree programs, our house was hit by lightning. His computer was fried and along with it, his whole portfolio of creative work. This was in the days before he knew to back up his files and before we had so many options for keeping multiple backup copies of files. His dream of going to film school was shattered. He pressed on and got some degrees in cinematography but more importantly, he kept working in the field.

Working with Others

We encouraged him to learn from others but give more than he takes. Tell good stories. Make good videos. Put in the hard work even when no one is watching. He ended up starting his own videography business. It was tough because as a small business owner, he had to put in a lot of hours covering all the different roles from sound to filming to editing to directing. He worked other jobs as needed to make ends meet while pursuing his dream.

The Results

After 12 years of working hard in his field, my son was ready to step in when his name was called. He had put in the hard work. He was faithful. He had integrity. So when there was an opening to work with this team on Challenge Accepted, he was invited to join them and ready to put in the work.

Important Lessons

Here are some important life lessons learned along the way:

  • You don’t have to participate the way the world tells you that you have to compete to get ahead.
  • Raise your children to be masters at their skill so their work stands out from the rest.
  • Don’t go along to get along if it means compromising your values.

Be watchful observers of your children. What do they spend their time doing when they don’t have to be doing it? Encourage and support those bents and interests. Maybe they’ll win an Emmy someday. Maybe they will send a rocket to Mars. Maybe they will change culture.

References and Links

The following may contain affiliate links.

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Raising a Creative Child - ETB #145
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